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Hunterian Museum & Art Gallery William Hunter Collections:
GLAHA 43785


This information is © The Hunterian Museum and Art Gallery, University of Glasgow 2017

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GLAHM 43785: 'The Entombment' c.1639 - click to view larger image GLAHM 43785: 'The Entombment' c.1639 - click to view larger image

"The Entombment" c.1639

oil painting

CRE REMBRANDT, Harmensz van Rijn; (Dutch; 1606-1669)


Materials:
oil on oak panel
Dimensions:
32.2 x 40.5
Frame:
Modern Pear Ast 47 x 56. Original frame: 48.0 x 56.0 French Louis XV carved and gilded ogee section
Marks:
inscr on verso in ink "43 No 97"; inscr on verso in red crayon "14"
References:
A105 Rembrandt Research Project 1982 A Corpus of Rembrandt Paintings, The Hague and London, 1982
Notes:
This is one of a small group of almost monochrome sketches by Rembrandt. It relates to a composition in a vertical format for a picture commissioned for Prince Frederick Henry of Orange (Munich, Alte Pinakothek), painted between 1636 and 1639. Hunter paid just 12 guineas for this study at Sir Robert Strange's sale in 1771. The sketch is closely related to the Entombment (now in Munich - unfinished in 1639) forming part of the Passion series (1632-1646) commissioned for Prince Frederik Hendrik. This panel is probably the "schets van de begraeffenis Christi - a sketch of an entombment" which was listed in the contents of Rembrandt's house at the time of his bankruptcy in 1656. It has been suggested that this painting is a sketch for an etching made at the time when Rembrandt was living and working with the dealer Hendrik Uylenburgh. However, such an etching was never executed, and the painting is unlike the grisailles made specifically for prints, since it is not strictly speaking monochrome. The Rembrandt Research Project categorised this work as autograph, and there are no known copies, further strengthening its claim to be an important personal working out of a passion theme which Rembrandt kept among his own possessions. It appears to be a finished painting with parts deliberately left in a freely sketched state. Recent research suggests that it was begun in the 1630s with revisions in the 1650s including the bright figure of the woman with candle, painted in thick impasto. Bequeathed by Dr William Hunter, 1783
Keywords:
NEW TESTAMENT : BIBLE : CHRIST : DEATH : FIGURE : MALE : SKETCH : STRANGE : HUNTER 2007 : NIRP2005 : NIRP2005 : ON DISPLAY :

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For more information please contact Malcolm.Chapman@glasgow.ac.uk